Office and Industry

Manhattan Office Tower

Paris
France

This project involved renovating a 27-storey office block built in the 1970s. The mixed concrete and metal structure was stripped and the asbestos removed one floor at a time, without the occupants having to relocate. Parquet floors and false ceilings were reconstructed in line with new technologies and all the heating, ventilation and lighting systems renewed. At the same time as the renovation, a plan to raise the building height was also drawn up. This was possible due to the overdimensioning of the structure.

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North Galaxy - Office Towers

Brussels
Belgium

Located just after the Belgacom headquarters and part of the line of buildings on boulevard Albert II in Brussels, these two 28 storey tower blocks are linked by a much lower six-storey building and relate the twin, sparse towers of the World Trade Center. Initial studies for the project focused on the subtle nuances needed to establish an individual identity while remaining in harmony with the tone of this business district.

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Central Plaza - Office building

Brussels
Belgium

A former hotel converted into offices, the tower block that occupied this site, close to the historic centre of Brussels, no longer complied with existing occupancy and safety regulations. The reconstruction project was the subject of a competition organised by the Compagnie Immobilière de Belgique. The major difficulty lay in the mixed nature of the buildings in the area - eclectic and modern buildings all in close proximity to the cathedral. The local authorities had expressed a particular desire to reduce the height of the building, while retaining the total surface area.

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J.J. Delens Headquarters

Brussels
Belgium

The starting point for the architects was a long building on two floors with relatively poor lighting. The guiding principles in renovating this building to provide offices for a major construction company were a search for quality of space and light, creating an environment conducive to work. An interior “street”, illuminated with overhead lighting, was created to open up the total length of the building. The external facades are formed of large glass panels protected from the sun by cedar wood louvres. External walls are finished in terra cotta elements.

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Degroof Bank HQ & Agency

Brussels
Belgium

This building was created between two existing constructions. On one side a former town house in the neoclassical style, the last vestiges of the former residential Léopold Quarter and now home to the Bank Degroof. On the other side, an office building of modernistic style. In harmony with the former in terms of its proportions, and with a facade based on the principle of the golden rectangle, the new building adopts a contemporary language - in metal and glass - that contrasts with the context and lends interest to the sequence.

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Covent Garden

Brussels
Belgium

This office complex occupies a site in a transitional zone between the architectural scale of the original major boulevards and the very different dimensions of Brussels’ North District with its modern, glass high-rise buildings. The result has been to create a “dialogue” between two buildings, one high and one low, each forming a distinct entity, linked by a covered garden. This space is also the entrance to the office complex, where one side opens onto the Place Rogier, the other to the Jardin Botanique, creating the perception of a much larger area.

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Groupe Chèque Déjeuner HQ

Gennevilliers
France

For their new headquarters, “Groupe Chèque Déjeuner” chose to house all of their various activities in one building, conceived as a series of volumes raised on “pilotis” or columns, all grouped around a vast atrium. The 5-level central body of the project is surrounded by several 3-story wings echoing the smaller buildings already completed in the surrounding business park and designed by the same tea.

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Biot - Competition

Nice
France

This project to erect office buildings and apartments in the municipality of Biot, near Nice is part of the larger “Sophia Antipolis” development aimed at creating a high-technology and industrial centre in southern France. The project’s creators adopted a very bold approach to the competition, seeking to develop the principles of a hyper-ecological architecture with the least possible impact on the site and incorporating water recovery and natural air conditioning. The design of the concrete and wood buildings take their inspiration from the trees.

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